Pockets of deprivation in affluent areas – coastal and rural communities have problems

“Children from deprived backgrounds face the worst prospects in some of the richest parts of the country, according to a damning new study that lays bare deep geographical divisions across Britain.

An annual report by the government’s own social mobility watchdog warns that while London and its suburbs are pulling away, rural, coastal and former industrial areas are being left behind.

The State of the Nation report finds that some of the wealthiest areas in England – including west Berkshire, the Cotswolds and Crawley, deliver worse outcomes for their disadvantaged children than places that are much poorer, such as Sunderland and Tower Hamlets. …

… Other findings include that:

51% of children on free school meals in London achieve A* to C grades in English and maths GCSE compared with a 36% average in all other regions.

There is a gulf between the highest figures of 63% in Westminster and the lowest, 27% on the Isle of the Wight

Meanwhile in Kensington and Chelsea, 50% of disadvantaged youngsters make it to university compared with just 10% in Hastings, Barnsley and Eastbourne

Some of the worst performing areas, such as Weymouth and Portland, and Allerdale, are rural not urban

In fact, in 71, largely rural areas, more than 30% of the people earn below the voluntary living wage – with average wages in west Somerset just £312 a week, less than half of the best performing areas

In Bolsover just 17% of residents are in jobs that are professional and managerial positions compared with 51% in Oxford

The study says that a critical factor in the best performing councils is the quality of teachers available, with secondary teachers 70% more likely to leave the profession in deprived areas.

Although richer parts of Britain do tend to outperform more deprived areas overall in the social mobility index designed by researchers, that isn’t always true. Some of the most affluent areas do worse for the poor kids than some of the least well off.

Coastal areas are a focus of the report, with warnings about schools being isolated. Recommendations include more collaboration between schools and subsidised travel for disadvantaged young people in isolated areas. The commission also calls for central government to fund a push for schools in rural and coastal areas to work together.

They also say that the government should rebalance the national transport budget to help tackle regional disparities. …

…. The report calls for the Department for Education’s £72m funding for opportunity areas to be matched by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills in order to link up schooling and workplace opportunities.”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/nov/28/disadvantaged-children-face-worse-outcomes-in-rich-areas-report-finds

One thought on “Pockets of deprivation in affluent areas – coastal and rural communities have problems

  1. Unfortunately there is nothing in this report which correlates academic achievement with education funding.

    It seems to me to be likely that the most likely explanation for “51% of children on free school meals in London achieve A* to C grades in English and maths GCSE compared with a 36% average in all other regions” is that London education funding is significantly higher than in all other regions.

    Postcode lottery in Education.
    Postcode lottery in Social Care.
    Postcode lottery in Health Services.

    The moral of the tale: If you want great education, social care or health care, move to London or a marginal constituency.

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