More revolving doors: Test & Trace civil servant’s secondment from US firm

“Around 2 per cent of GPs are privately owned through Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS), a policy introduced in 2004. Unlike other practices, they are allowed to make a profit.” [News to Owl – must have been sleeping]

Revolving doors and Chinese Walls (which may be fake – Owl).

George Grylls, Political Reporter | Katie Gibbons www.thetimes.co.uk 

One of the most senior civil servants in the health department is on secondment from an American healthcare giant that has recently taken over NHS services covering 500,000 patients.

Tim de Winter, the deputy director of the government’s Test & Trace programme, has signed a one-year contract that allows him to return to the private sector later this year.

Simon Case, the head of the civil service, has instructed senior staff to declare any second jobs by the end of the week after it emerged that Bill Crothers, the former head of procurement, was allowed to combine roles at Greensill Capital with one of the most senior positions in the Cabinet Office.

In September, de Winter will go back to working at Operose, a subsidiary of US health insurer Centene. He has given up all his responsibilities at Operose during the 12 months he is employed by the government.

Operose recently took over 37 GP practices in London in a deal rumoured to be worth £140 million, taking its total portfolio to 58 GP practices caring for over 500,000 patients in cities including Birmingham, Leeds, Nottingham.

Around 2 per cent of GPs are privately owned through Alternative Provider Medical Services (APMS), a policy introduced in 2004. Unlike other practices, they are allowed to make a profit.

Justin Madders, shadow health minister said: “To be able to walk out of working for the NHS one day and into a company that has taken over NHS services the next is a highly disturbing development”.

A health department spokesman said: “Tim de Winter has not been employed by any other private companies while working for NHS T&T.” He had signed an agreement which included clauses around confidentiality, disclosure and data protection.

Operose Health said that de Winter “cannot carry out any work for Operose Health during the secondment”.