Exeter Hill Barton homes to be decided on Monday

The site forms part of a major housing expansion in the area, as part of the Monkerton and Hill Barton masterplan which is included in the city’s housing land supply.

This document, published in 2010, provides a framework to “guide the future development of a sustainable urban extension to the north east of the city.”

Ollie Heptinstall, local democracy reporter www.radioexe.co.uk

They could affect Met Office satellite info

New homes on the outskirts of Exeter could affect the Met Office’s ability to receive satellite information, unless planning conditions are put in place.

The weather forecaster has submitted a response to outline plans for up to 285 new homes at Hill Barton that city councillors will consider next week.

Devon developer Salter Property wants to built the properties just north of the Met Office, on land between it and Hollow Lane.

The site forms part of a major housing expansion in the area, as part of the Monkerton and Hill Barton masterplan which is included in the city’s housing land supply.

This document, published in 2010, provides a framework to “guide the future development of a sustainable urban extension to the north east of the city.”

In the last couple of years, approval has been given for housing on land adjoining the site , with construction well underway and many homes already built.

The wider development area received outline permission for 750 homes in 2013.

There is likely to be a mix of properties including houses and flats, however this does not need to be confirmed at the outline stage and will be subject to the final stage ‘reserved matters’ application.

The proposal will also provide open space with a multi-use games area (MUGA) and other equipped play areas.

Planning officers recommend approval, subject to a number of conditions and contributions towards local amenities. This includes £1 million towards new secondary school provision at South West Exeter, over £500,000 in transport contributions and £166,349 for GPs to be able to take on more patients.

The council wants 35 per cent of the homes set aside as affordable, in line with its policy for new developments, with 70 per cent of these for social rent.

Four objections have been received from members of the public, with worries about overdevelopment, a loss of open green space, and nearby schools and GP surgeries being “over capacity to cope.”

The Met Office’s concern is about the potential for the construction work to “obstruct the receipt of satellite data transmissions” but it has has no objection subject to the “inclusion of suitable worded planning conditions” to prevent such issues.

In conclusion, the planning officer’s report states: “The site is allocated with the core strategy for residential development and therefore the principle of development is considered to be acceptable.”

“Furthermore, the site has previously benefitted from an outline consent for residential development as part of a wider site, large parts of which have already been constructed.

“The development would provide a significant level of housing towards the council five-year housing supply which is to be welcomed.

“The application is for outline planning permission and therefore, while some concerns have been identified with the illustrative layout submitted, these have been drawn to the attention of the applicant. It is considered that there is no reason why these cannot be addressed as part of any ‘reserved matters’ application…”