Breaking: Liz Truss campaign’s biggest donation came from wife of former BP executive

The donation may raise eyebrows given Ms Truss’s refusal to further tax oil and gas firms to help people with the soaring bills, fuelled by Russia’s war in Ukraine.

Today’s Steve Bell cartoon

The single biggest donation to Liz Truss’s successful campaign for the Tory leadership came from the wife of a former BP executive.

Matt Mathers www.independent.co.uk

Fitriani Hay, the wife of James Hay, donated £100,000 to Ms Truss. It came as the new prime minister set out her plan to help families struggling with their energy bills.

Ms Truss said she would freeze bills at £2,500, which will be paid for by additional government borrowing. She declined to extend the windfall tax on the large profits of oil and gas giants.

James Hay joined BP as an engineer in the 1970s and spent nearly three decades working for the multinational firm, where he later became a senior executive.

He is now the chairman of Dubai-based JMH Group, a private family business operating in the luxury goods markets.

Mr Hay married his wife Fitriani in 1996 and they have two daughters. According to The Sunday Times Rich List he is worth £325 million.

The donation may raise eyebrows given Ms Truss’s refusal to further tax oil and gas firms to help people with the soaring bills, fuelled by Russia’s war in Ukraine.

Rishi Sunak, who Ms Truss defeated in the race to replace Boris Johnson, introduced the initial levy and said he was open to extending it if he became prime minister.

Opposition parties also called for an additional windfall tax, a policy which is widely popular among voters and has been introduced in several countries across Europe.

Ms Truss has said that extending the levy would deter investment – something Mr Sunak said before later going ahead with the policy.

In the House of Commons on Thursday, Ms Truss confirmed energy bills for the average household will be frozen at no more than £2,500.

She also confirmed that businesses will be spared crippling increases.

Her two-year plan, paid for by tens of billions of pounds of borrowing will save the typical household around £1,000 from October and protect billpayers from further expected rises over the coming months.

For businesses and other non-domestic users such as schools and hospitals, which have not been covered by the existing price cap, a six-month scheme will offer equivalent support.

Ms Truss told MPs: “This is the moment to be bold. We are facing a global energy crisis and there are no cost-free options.”

Downing Street has refused to put a cost on the programme, previously estimated to cost up to £150 billion. The PM’s official spokesman would only say the price will be “tens of billions”.

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