Hemingway designs for Exmouth on display 13-14 November: 4.5 hours to view materials, 2 hours for presentation of feedback

Doesn’t seem a lot of time for such an important project … and it sounds like “show and tell” rather rhan “show and listen”.

“Hemingway Design – tasked with creating a vision for the third phase of the seafront regeneration scheme – will outline the feedback they received from an online survey and how those views have guided the proposals.

The phase three site includes the former Exmouth Fun Park and the plot currently occupied by Harbour View Café.

People can view the exhibition materials on

Wednesday, November 13, from noon until 4.30pm at a public drop-in at the same venue.

The event, organised by Hemingway Design and supported by East Devon District Council, will take place between

5.30pm and 7.30pm on
Thursday, November 14, at Ocean.

The exhibition will also look at ways that these opportunities can be realistically implemented.

Commercial property advisors from Lambert Smith Hampton will be on hand to advise on deliverability of the proposals. …”

https://www.exmouthjournal.co.uk/news/hemingway-design-public-exhibition-event-1-6334227

“£14 Billion ‘wasted’ by the government on ‘botched’ outsourcing”

“The government has wasted at least £14 billion between 2016 and 2019 on poorly managed outsourcing contracts finds a report from the Reform Think Tank.

The report is based on an analysis of investigations by the National Audit Office NAO), Parliamentary Select Committees and other statutory bodies. The total value of the contracts investigated was £71.1 billion.

The Ministry of Defence accounts for 27 per cent of this waste. This includes a 17 year delay in the full decommissioning of nuclear submarines and a poorly planned army recruitment programme. This saw soldiers forced into backoffice jobs to clear an IT backlog created by an untested IT system created in partnership between the army and Capita.

Other examples include the vastly expensive liquidation of Carrillion, which cost the government at least £148 million as well as involving the time and resources of 14 government departments and public bodies.

Also the Department for Education continued to give Learndirect £105 million after the programme was rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted. This should have led to the funding being withdrawn.

A third of the government’s annual budget is spent on outsourced services, at a total of ££292 Billion.

Reform is now calling for an independent regulator of the outsourcing sector which – unlike the NAO or Select Committees would have the power to enforce change and impose sanctions on failing providers.

Senior Researcher and Reform procurement lead, Dr Joshua Pritchard said “Our public services cannot function without outsourcing. But when it goes wrong, it’s taxpayers who end up footing the bill

“The £14.3 billion wasted as a result of poorly drawn up and managed government contracts is inexcusable.

“We need a new regulator with the power to prevent public money being squandered because of totally avoidable mistakes.”

£14 Billion ‘wasted’ by the government on ‘botched’ outsourcing

“Seaside residents dominate personal debt league in England and Wales”

Owl says: Has anyone seen policies to reverse this trend from our Local Enterprise Partnership? Or even from EDDC? Or DCC?

Hint: development in Exmouth is the “traditional” kind the article points out as leading to problems.

“Seaside towns and cities dominate the list of areas with the highest numbers of people getting into serious difficulties with debt, according to new figures.

Scarborough, the largest resort on the Yorkshire coast, ranked second out of 347 local authorities in England and Wales for personal insolvencies, while Torbay in Devon – which includes the town of Torquay – came third, said the accountancy firm UHY Hacker Young.

Plymouth, on the south coast of Devon, was ranked fourth, while Blackpool was in sixth place.

However, it was the city of Stoke-on-Trent in the Midlands which had the highest rate of personal insolvencies, recording just over 51 per 10,000 adults in 2018. The national average was 25, said the firm.

The insolvency rate includes personal bankruptcies, debt relief orders and individual voluntary arrangements….

Other coastal locations or regions featured in the firm’s “top 20” included Weymouth and Portland in Dorset, which includes the resort of Weymouth, which was in 12th place (39.6 insolvencies per 10,000 adults); the Isle of Wight, in 13th place (39.3 per 10,000); Great Yarmouth in Norfolk, in 14th place (39.2 per 10,000); Cornwall, in 17th place (38.5 per 10,000); and Hastings in East Sussex, in 19th place (38 per 10,000).

The accountancy firm said many coastal towns outside south-east England had struggled to replace their traditional industries with faster growth sectors such as financial services and technology. …”

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/oct/21/seaside-residents-dominate-personal-debt-league-in-england-and-wales?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Bigger problems than Brexit?

“Lord Mervyn King calls for general election to provide mandate for either Leave or Remain.

Brexit is stopping Britain from addressing deep problems with its economy, a former Bank of England governor has warned.

Mervyn King called for an election and a new parliament to resolve the current impasse, claiming that “most people think that this has gone on for far too long and just have the view – ‘just do it’”.

He added that it did not matter whether people voted to remain or leave the European Union.

Lord King was speaking after MPs voted to delay a meaningful vote on the prime minister’s deal, forcing Boris Johnson to write to the EU to ask for a further extension to the Brexit process.

“It’s frustrating parliament can’t make up its mind and hasn’t been able to vote but let’s hope they do,” Lord King told Sky News after his speech at the International Monterary Fund’s annual meetings in Washington.

He warned the all-consuming nature of Brexit meant politicians were not looking at the UK’s underlying economic challenges.

“We have one of the lowest savings rates in the British economy of any country in the G20 save perhaps for Argentina. We’re not saving enough to finance our pensions or care for the elderly, or to finance infrastructure.

“These are the big challenges. What do we do about the education of 50 per cent of people who don’t go to college or university? It’s a great shame [Brexit] has dragged on so long.”

Although he claimed that Britain was “in the middle of the worst political and constitutional crisis for arguably several hundred years”, Lord King downplayed the impact Brexit could have on the UK and world economies.

“The decision to leave the EU is not likely to have a major impact on the UK economy in any way… I think there’s an awful lot of bogus quantification going on to justify positions held for other reasons,” he said. “I don’t honestly believe that Brexit has any great significance even for the rest of Europe, let alone the rest of the world. I don’t think the long-run economic consequences of the UK leaving the EU are particularly large.”

But he warned the global economy was in “great stagnation”, having grown more slowly and for a longer period than before the Great Depression of the 1930s, with levels of debt higher than they were before the 2008 financial crash.

Lord King, who governed the UK’s central bank for a decade until 2013, asserted the global economy would not be likely to suffer another financial crisis in the next 12 months.

But he warned of a global low-growth problem that wouldn’t be solved by another cut in interest rates, exacerbated by “extraordinary uncertainty”, and admitted “no one knows” whether another financial crisis is on the cards.

“We need a much wider set of policies to get out of this,” Lord King said.

The UK economy unexpectedly shrank 0.2 per cent in this year’s second financial quarter – its first contraction since 2012.”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-economy-mervyn-king-bank-england-election-recession-debt-a9163531.html

Nearly 75% of government contractors are based in tax havens

“Almost three-quarters of companies who have been given major government contracts have operations based in tax havens, according to a new report.

Value Added, published on Sunday by the thinktank Demos, reveals that 25 of the government’s 34 strategic suppliers – organisations that receive £100m or more in revenue from the government – operate in offshore centres.

According to estimates, they account for about a fifth of total central government procurement spend. Of these, 19 had operations in jurisdictions included on the EU’s “blacklist” or “greylist” of countries that are considered to be non-compliant with EU international standards for “good tax behaviour”, according to the report.

The Labour MP and former chair of the public accounts committee, Margaret Hodge, said it was “perverse that the government continues to pay significant sums of taxpayer money to big corporations that practise tax avoidance on an alarming scale”.

There are claims that aggressive use of tax havens can distort competition.

The Labour peer, Lord Haskel, added: “For too long large international tech companies have failed to pay their fair share of tax while being rewarded with government contracts, leaving British companies at a competitive disadvantage.”

The Demos report states: “Large multinational companies, for example, continue to squeeze their tax contributions ever lower: the OECD estimates that US$100–$240bn (£78bn-£186bn) is lost globally in revenue each year from base erosion and profit shifting by multinational companies.” …”

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/20/tax-havens-uk-government-pays-millions-strategic-suppliers?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Sick people in Budleigh area can’t get to medical appointments due to lack of voluntary drivers

“People across Budleigh Salterton are missing vital medical appointments due to of a severe lack of voluntary car drivers.

Transport charity TRIP, which runs Budleigh Voluntary Car Service, has eleven drivers helping out, but most can only do limited times and days.

Neil Hurlock, office manager for the charity, said: “We desperately need more drivers.

“We are turning away several people a week because we have not got drivers.

“We had a case where we had no drivers available one day – this happened two weeks on the trot.”

The car service was created to provide transport by car for disabled people or frail elderly people who struggle to use public transport – either because there is no transport available or because they cannot walk to a bus stop or easily climb on and off a bus.

As well as covering Budleigh, the service extends to residents living in Colaton Raleigh, East Budleigh, Otterton, Woodbury, Woodbury Salterton and Yettington.

Mr Hurlock said a lack of on-call drivers could have serious implications to those relying on the service to get to appointments.

He said: “It means some of our users will not be able to attend medical appointments. If we do not get more drivers, then people are unfortunately going to be continuing to miss appointments.

“That is going to have a knock-on effect on their health because they will not be getting to their appointments at Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital.

“We want to make sure these people are attending their appointments.”

The voluntary car scheme sees people utilise their own vehicles to help people visit hospitals and go shopping.

Anyone can become a voluntary driver and full training is provided by TRIP.

The charity also offers the opportunity for those interested to attend a ride-along to see if they are suited for the role.

The charity offers 45p a mile in fuel expenses.

For more information, drop into the TRIP offices in New Street, Honiton, or call 01404 46529.”

https://www.exmouthjournal.co.uk/news/voluntary-drivers-needed-in-budleigh-devon-1-6329908