Farmer Neil Parish might want to slap Michael Gove’s wrist!

“It’s beginning to dawn on many UK farmers that the British government might not be quite so clued up as they had been led to believe. Not only do they now doubt that the current levels of subsidies they receive will continue post-Brexit, they also worry that their needs for seasonal workers to pick vegetables and soft fruit have not been fully understood.

The latest cause for alarm has been a video produced by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) to promote its vision for post-Brexit agriculture.

It’s all very nostalgically rustic, with fields of barley rippling in the wind and glorious sunsets. A vision of mellow fruitfulness. Except for one thing. Some sections of it were filmed overseas.

As the magazine Farmers’ Weekly has observed, the scene in which Defra promise that farmers can expect less red tape was actually footage of an inspector visiting a Slovenian cattle shed, while the section on British farmers being rewarded for improving air and water quality was filmed on a German farm. To complete the hat-trick of errors, the part where Defra promise kick-backs for farmers who try to prevent climate change was accompanied by a framer planting a Bonsai tree.

We pay these people.”

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/sep/21/theresa-may-memorabilia-why-not-now-may-be-her-time

“Bombshell No Deal Brexit documents show councils fear billions in lost funding and soaring poverty”

Remember, EDDC has confirmed it has done NO Brexit planning:

https://eastdevonwatch.org/2018/09/06/eddc-has-done-no-brexit-planning/

“Councils have compiled a dossier of No Deal Brexit documents which warn that thousands could be left destitute in communities across the country.

Local authorities fear they may be left “unable to effectively support local communities” but they warn that the Government is failing to heed the warnings.

They say that a post Brexit downturn could see businesses up and down the country go bust.

While a series of major investment proposals have been put on hold due to Brexit.

A number of councils suggested Brexit will make desperately needed regeneration projects “unviable”.

Strikingly some of the most stark warnings come from areas which voted to Leave.

Fenland District Council rank the risk associated with a no deal Brexit on the same level as that of a natural disaster.

The area in the East of England depends on unskilled labour from Eastern Europe and 70% of people living there voted to Leave.

It produced a corporate risk register in June which gave the risk of failing to take action to prepare for Brexit a score of 25/25.

That rating is reserved for items with the potential for “catastrophic impact” and equal to the threat posed by a natural disaster.

Hackney Council raised concerns over the impact of Brexit on local job growth, with one local business claiming Brexit had “traumatised our office and the sector we cover”.

Hackney also echoed other local councils in reporting a spike in hate crimes since the 2016 referendum.

Harrow Council in London also predicted an increases in levels of poverty, homelessness and health inequalities in the Borough.

Lancashire County Council highlighted the importance of EU trade, with 62% of Lancashire’s exports (£1,876 million per year) destined for the EU market.

Around 300 councils replied to the Freedom of Information requests which were put in by campaigning group Best for Britain- making the project one of the largest bodies of research into Brexit planning undertaken so far.

Commenting on the findings, Best for Britain champion Layla Moran MP said: “These internal council documents are devastating. They show Brexit will cause tremendous damage to their ability to provide the quality public services towns and cities up and down the country so desperately need.

“The only thing scarier than these documents is the fact that some councils haven’t done them – effectively they’re walking off a cliff blindfolded.

“The finger should point directly at those extremist Brexiteers in the Tory party with a gun to the country’s head. We cannot let this sinister gang of hucksters usurp common decency and sensible politics.

“Thankfully, the fight isn’t over. We can still put a stop to this madness through a people’s vote with the option to stay in the EU. Only then will the people of this country be able to compare the devastation of Brexit – as shown in these documents – with the bespoke deal we’ve been building up over the past four decades.”

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/bombshell-no-deal-brexit-documents-13238369

Neil Parish and Brexit – here’s how you can find out his view on farming post-Brexit – and his take on the Irish border!

While local non-Tory oiks are not allowed into Parish’s talk about Brexit next week (see post below – even non-member spouses will be thrown out of the meeting) we CAN find out what he thinks about post-Brexit farming, thanks to the fact that he WILL talk to lawyers about it! Presumably, all lawyers are paid-up party members!

And he DOES have a view on the thorny question of the Irish border problem:

“The Irish border is important because pigs and lambs go either way. The border issue needs to be right, if it is difficult as neither side will want to be blamed but this might ultimately help us get a deal.”

https://www.clarkewillmott.com/blog/brexit-and-agriculture-a-conversation-with-neil-parish/

Neil Parish will only talk to party members about Brexit – not even non-member spouses allowed! And questions in advance only

“Date Thursday, 13th September 2018
Time 1900
at COLLITON BARTON EVENTS AND TRAINING CENTRE, BROADHEMBURY, EX14 3LJ

(by kind permission of the Persey family)

ROGER PERSEY, past President of Tiverton & Honiton Conservative Association, to host and moderate the evening.

Please take this opportunity to make your voice heard via our MP.

Timetable & format

7:00pm Arrival and take your seats

7:15pm Questions from members – submitted in advance to arrive by email or post by 5:30pm on 11th September

8:15pm Final questions and finish followed by cheese & wine provided by Neil Parish M.P.

8:45pm Close

This event is only open to current Conservative Party members of the Tiverton & Honiton Conservative Association. This means that spouses, partners or others arriving with a member must themselves be current members – otherwise with regret they will be refused admittance.

RSVP,with details of any companions, by 5:30pm on 11th of September”

https://www.tivertonhonitonconservatives.co.uk/events/brexit-question-time-neil-parish-mp

EDDC has done no Brexit planning

Response to Freedom of Information request:

“Brexit impact assessments

Date submitted: 3 August 2018

Summary of request

1. Please provide any Brexit impact assessments conducted by your council, or other forms of Brexit planning. If you haven’t undertaken any Brexit impact assessments please provide other forms of Brexit planning, as well as any notes for context.

2. Please provide any emails relating to Brexit planning/the impact of Brexit.
Summary of response

1. Please provide any Brexit impact assessments conducted by your council, or other forms of Brexit planning. If you haven’t undertaken any Brexit impact assessments please provide other forms of Brexit planning, as well as any notes for context – EDDC have not carried out any Brexit impact assessments or any other forms of planning. For further information please refer your enquiry to the Brexit Resilience Group ran by Phil Norrey at Devon County Council:

Frances Williams
Executive PA to the Chief Executive & Head of Organisational Development
Devon County Council
County Hall
Topsham Road
EXETER
EX2 4QD
Tel: 01392 383201 or Frances.williams@devon.gov.uk

2. Please provide any emails relating to Brexit planning/the impact of Brexit – None

Date responded: 14 August 2018”

“Council in legal bid to force disclosure of Brexit impact”

“Plymouth City Council has claimed to be the first to use the Sustainable Communities Act to try to force the government to reveal the impact of Brexit.

It will also encourage other local authorities to take similar steps. Leader Tudor Evans has used the act to ask the government share with the council what it knows about Brexit’s affect on the city, even if the information concerned is considered confidential.

In a letter to communities secretary James Brokenshire, Cllr Evans demanded: “Immediate receipt by Plymouth City Council of all government departmental information and analysis pertaining to the impacts upon Plymouth’s communities and businesses of the UK’s withdrawal from the European Union, including any information deemed by the government to be confidential.”

The Sustainable Communities Act 2007 allows local authorities to ask central government to remove legislative or other barriers to the improvement of the economic, social and environmental well-being of their area.

Plymouth’s use of it is based on the council’s fears about the impact of Brexit on the city’s economy.

Cllr Evans said: “Brexit is going to have an impact on Plymouth, that is for sure. But for this council to do the job of protecting businesses and residents, we have to know exactly what the government has planned for us because at the moment, we don’t know.

“We’ve seen various dossiers released in the last few weeks. They have been at best woolly and do not address what Brexit means for individual communities.”

He said Plymouth relied on imports and exports, and half of its 20 largest companies were foreign owned and had invested there because of the direct access to the EU market.

“Although we are the first council to use the [sustainable communities] act in this way, I don’t expect us to be the last,” Cllr Evans said. “I will be speaking to colleagues all around the country in the next few days to help put pressure on the government for answers.”

http://localgovernmentlawyer.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=36539%3Acouncil-in-legal-bid-to-force-disclosure-of-brexit-impact&catid=59&Itemid=27

Britain’s richest (pro-Brexit) person moves himself and ALL his assets to tax-free Monaco

“Reclusive titan of industry Jim Ratcliffe has found himself under unusual scrutiny after being declared Britain’s richest man, with his political leanings and tax affairs coming under the microscope.

The 65-year-old head of the Ineos chemicals group has assets worth an estimated £21 billion ($26.7 billion, 23.5 billion euros), putting him top of the 2018 Sunday Times rich list.

He was only 18th on last year’s list but the value of his company, of which he owns 60 percent, soared last year, propelling him up the ranks and earning him a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II.

It is a long way from his humble beginnings, growing up in social housing in Manchester, northern England. …..

Despite his success, Ratcliffe has long-remained a “secret” and “lonely” character, earning nicknames such as “JR” — in reference to manipulative oil baron in the US TV saga “Dallas” — and James Bond villain “Dr. No”, according to a 2014 Financial Times profile.

Privacy is also a hallmark of his Ineos group, which is not listed on the stock exchange and therefore has no obligation to disclose its accounts.

However, the businessman has made his views known on the thorny issue of Brexit, coming out as one of the few bosses to support the move to leave the European Union, like fellow entrepreneur James Dyson.

“The Brits are perfectly capable of managing the Brits and don’t need Brussels telling them how to manage things,” he told the Sunday Times a year before the June 2016 referendum.

Despite his professed patriotism, Ratcliffe has shifted his fortune to Monaco, according to British media, taking advantage of the principality’s generous tax regime.

The move put him in the sights of pro-EU politicians, who accused him of hypocrisy.

“It’s strange for someone who presents themselves as highly patriotic and has been given honours to move to a notorious tax haven,” Liberal Democrat leader Vince Cable told The Times.

“It’s unfortunate that when we make a song and dance about a national hero who’s investing in the UK, they disappear to Monaco.”

Tax concerns had already led him to relocate the headquarters of his company to Switzerland in 2010, before returning to London in 2016, saying he wanted to demonstrate his confidence in Britain’s post-Brexit economy.