Feniton shows Honiton how to conduct a Neighbourhood Plan consultation

After the total fiasco of Honiton finding itself unable to organise a Neighbourhood Plan:

https://eastdevonwatch.org/2018/05/15/unbelievable-creation-of-honitons-neighbourhood-plan-could-be-shelved-until-2020/

comes this press release from Feniton’s Independent Councillor Susie Bond:

And it’s great news!
The polls in the Feniton Neighbourhood Plan referendum closed at 10 p.m. this evening and counting started very soon afterwards.

The choice was a simple Yes/No answer to the following question:

Do you want East Devon District Council to use the neighbourhood plan for Feniton to help it decide planning applications in the neighbourhood area?

· The number of people eligible to vote was 1538
· Turnout was 32.05%
· Those voting Yes = 462
· Those voting No = 30

Without wishing to sound like I’m giving a speech at the Oscars, there are many people who should be thanked, not least officers at East Devon District Council who guided the team throughout, but also the NP steering group and particularly those who stuck with the process right to the bitter end.

It was the vision of the Parish Council Chairman, Martyn Smith, that set us on this rather lengthy road and I’m sure we all felt from time to time as though the process was interminable.

But we made it … and the Neighbourhood Plan will now pass into planning policy …

Well done Feniton”

New EDDC Leader a ‘solution finder’ says another obsequious Tory Councillor

Owl says: Ah, Mark Williamson – how little you understand about your own council! What it REALLY needs is a leader who makes sure the problems don’t occur in the first place! Not one who has to get into the deep holes that have already been dug for him by his own party!

“East Devon District Council’s new leader has been described as a “solution finder” by a fellow councillor.

Councillor Ian Thomas was unanimously elected to become the new leader of the council at the annual council meeting last night.

The Conservative, who has represented Trinity Ward since 2009 and is a director of the Exeter Science Park Company, replaces Councillor Paul Diviani, who announced that he would be stepping down from his post earlier this year.

We all know that the next ten years will be the most difficult and challenging for local government, and we need someone with financial acumen and creativity to lead us, and in his business career, he has demonstrated that each day. He is a solution finder, and that is exactly what we need now and for the forthcoming year.”
Councillor Mark Williamson”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-devon-44037998

“NHS England and Capita misunderstood the risks in outsourcing primary care support services …” says hard-hitting report

Summary:

NHS England and Capita misunderstood the risks in outsourcing primary care support services resulting in services to 39,000 GPs, dentists, opticians and pharmacists that were a long way below an acceptable standard. Capita’s performance against the contract has improved but widespread failures are still being experienced by primary care practitioners, says today’s report by the National Audit Office (NAO).

In August 2015, NHS England entered into a seven-year, £330 million contract with Capita to deliver primary care support services. NHS England aimed to reduce its costs by 35% from the first year of the contract and provide a high-quality and standardised service. Capita expected to make a loss of £64 million in the first two years of the contract, which it planned to recoup in later years.

NHS England’s decision to contract with Capita both to run existing services but also simultaneously to transform those services, was high risk. Capita was incentivised through the contract to close existing services to minimise its losses but the interaction between running, closing and transforming services was more complex than Capita or NHS England had anticipated.

Performance issues emerged in 2016 shortly after Capita started closing primary care support offices and making other changes to the service. Capita acknowledges that it made performance issues worse by continuing to close support offices in summer 2016 even though it was aware the customer service centre was struggling to meet demand at that time. NHS England was contractually unable to stop Capita’s aggressive office closure programme, even though it was having a harmful impact on service delivery.

Failure to deliver key aspects of the end-to-end service, delivered by Capita and other organisations, impacted primary care services and, potentially, put patients at risk of serious harm. For example, 87 women were notified incorrectly that they were no longer part of the cervical screening programme; processing issues led to an estimated 1,000 GPs, dentists and opticians being delayed from working with patients and some of these practitioners lost earnings. No actual harm to patients has been identified.

Users continue to experience poor delivery with seven severe service failures in February 2018. A number of organisations have contributed to underperformance as Capita relies on other organisations to provide some services.

NHS England has made savings, in line with expectations, of £60 million in the first two years of the contract, as the financial risk of increased costs sits with Capita who have made a £125 million loss over this period. To date, NHS England has deducted £5.3 million from payments to Capita as penalties for poor performance but it expects it may have to pay up to £3 million in compensation to primary care providers.

NHS England has not yet secured all the benefits it wanted to achieve as Capita’s transformation programme was halted while it focused on operational issues. NHS England remain concerned about three of the services – the national performers lists, payments to opticians and GP payments and pensions but recognises that some of the issues with them pre-date the contract with Capita.

Two and a half years into the contract basic principles are still not agreed, which limits NHS England’s ability to hold Capita to account. NHS England and Capita have still not agreed how to calculate 11 performance measures, and how these data should be used to calculate payments owed to Capita for delivering the services.

The NAO recommends that NHS England should determine whether all current services within the contract are best delivered through that contract or be should taken in-house by NHS England.

“Neither NHS England nor Capita fully understood the complexity and variation of the services being outsourced. As a result, both parties misjudged the scale and nature of the risk in outsourcing these services. “While NHS England has achieved financial savings and some services have now improved, value for money is about more than just cost reduction. It is deeply unsatisfactory that, two and a half years into the contract, NHS England and Capita have not yet reached the level of partnership working required to make a contract like this work effectively.”

Amyas Morse, the head of the NAO, 17 May 2018″

https://www.nao.org.uk/press-release/nhs-englands-management-of-the-primary-care-support-services-contract-with-capita/

Full report here:

“Inpatients at Exmouth Hospital to be temporarily relocated during fire safety improvement project”

Owl adds: Did you know there were closed wards at Exmouth Hospital?

“News Release 16 May 2018

Inpatients at Exmouth Hospital are being temporarily relocated to another ward on the site while building owner NHS Property Services invests in fire safety improvements.

Beds on Doris Heard Ward are being moved to the vacant Geoffrey Willoughby Ward while a £50,000 project to safely remove asbestos and improve fire resistance takes place. A deep clean and air testing will also take place.

The works, carried out by Integral, will be undertaken from 21 May with the ward planned to be fully reopened during the week commencing 11 June 2018.
Due to the constraints of Geoffrey Willoughby Ward, the number of available beds will be temporarily reduced from 16 to 12 during this period.

Rosemary Kearney, Senior Facilities Management Business Manager for NHS Property Services (NHSPS) in the South West, said: “We’re working closely with our partners at the hospital to ensure services can, as far as possible, continue as normal.

“We’re sorry for any inconvenience but this is an essential project that will ultimately improve the fabric of Exmouth Hospital for patients for years to come.”

Donna Robson, Royal Devon and Exeter NHS Foundation Trust’s Matron at Exmouth Hospital, added: “Maintaining continuity of care for patients is our top priority. We’ve been working with NHSPS to ensure that any disruption is kept to a minimum during these necessary maintenance works. We’d like to thank our patients and visitors for their understanding during this time.”

All other services at the hospital are unaffected and patients should continue to attend their appointments as normal.

The need for the work was identified as part of a survey undertaken by NHSPS.”

The press release also includes background information for editors on NHSPS. This is not usually published with the press release but is information in the public domain, so Owl reproduces it here:

“NHS Property Services brings property and facilities management expertise to thousands of sites across the NHS estate.

At a time of major change and increasing demand for the NHS, NHS Property Services is reducing costs, creating a more fit for purpose estate and generating vital funds that are being reinvested to support improvements in frontline patient care.

The company’s portfolio consists of 3,500 properties – worth over £3 billion – which represents around 10 percent of the entire NHS estate. The vast majority of our sites are used for clinical, local healthcare and fall into one of three categories:

Health centres and GP surgeries; Hospitals/hospital- related properties; or Offices.

The company has a major role as both landlord and service provider for its NHS customers. Services fall into four main business areas:

1. Strategic estates planning – supporting our customers to deliver healthcare premises that meet future needs for patient services

2. Asset management – proactive asset management to create value and reduce overall costs of property

3. Construction project management – managing the development of new buildings and refurbishment of existing buildings, along with investment in our estate

4. Facilities management services – including health and safety, maintenance, electrical services, cleaning and catering.”

“NHS outsourcing ‘put patients at risk’ “

THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT OUR CCG IS ATTEMPTING TO DO – SLASH COSTS AND IMPLEMENTING NEW MEASURES AT THE SAME TIME YEY OUR DEVON TORIES ARE HAPPY FOR THE CCG TO EXPERIMENT ON US UN THIS WAY!

“Incompetent staff may have been allowed to carry on practising, the watchdog warned

“Patients were put at risk of cancer and other serious harm because of a botched £330 million NHS outsourcing deal, the spending watchdog has found.

An attempt at cost-cutting has led to more than two years of chaos in back-office services for GPs, opticians and dentists, the National Audit Office said.

Dozens of women were wrongly told that they no longer needed cervical cancer screening and incompetent staff may have been allowed to carry on practising, the report concludes.

The outsourcing company Capita and NHS England are still bickering about the deal, leading to failures including a backlog of half a million patient registrations, the NAO warns.

“Trying to slash costs by more than a third at the same time as implementing a raft of modernisation measures . . . potentially put patients at risk of serious harm,” Meg Hillier, chairwoman of the public accounts committee, said.”

Source: The Times (pay wall)