East Devon: fourth fastest aging population in the country

“Parts of the UK are ageing twice as fast as other areas of the country, while in some cities the population is getting younger, a divergence that will have a lasting impact on local economies, local government and national politics, according to new research. …

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/oct/28/some-parts-of-uk-ageing-twice-as-fast-as-others-new-research-finds?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

The research is here:
resolutionfoundation.org

Unemployment much higher than official figures (but not in Exeter)

“Millions more people in Britain are without a job than shown by official unemployment figures, according to a study that suggests the jobless rate should be almost three times higher.

According to research from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the Centre for Cities thinktank, large levels of “hidden” unemployment in towns and cities across Britain are excluded from the official government statistics.

The study found that more than 3 million people are missing from the headline unemployment rate because they report themselves as economically inactive to government labour force surveys, saying that they believe no jobs are available.

It said the true unemployment rate should rise from 4.6% to 13.2% of the working-age population not in education. The OECD made the estimate by creating an adjusted economic activity rate, which removes students, pensioners, people caring for family and people with health issues.

In a stark analysis of joblessness across the country, the assessment raises the total number of people out of a job who could work from the official level of 1.3 million to almost 4.5 million.

The Centre for Cities said that urban locations faced the highest levels of hidden joblessness. Liverpool had the highest rate in the country, with around one in five working-age adults not in education finding themselves out of work.

At 19.8% compared to 5.8% on official statistics, joblessness in the city ranked just ahead of Sunderland, Dundee, Blackburn and Birmingham.

All the top 10 cities with the highest adjusted economic inactivity rates were found to be outside London and the south-east, and all tended to have weaker economies. In contrast, cities across the south-east had much lower jobless rates, with Crawley recording the lowest adjusted rate of just 2%. Oxford and Exeter were also below 5%. …”

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/oct/17/unemployment-figures-should-be-millions-higher-says-research?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

“Doubts cast over Flybe staying at its Exeter headquarters”

“The new chief executive of Flybe has hinted that Devon will have to work with the airline to ensure its headquarters remains at Exeter Airport.

Flybe ran into financial difficulties last year and was rescued by a consortium of Virgin Atlantic, Stobart Group and Cyrus.

This week it announced that the airline would be rebranded Virgin Connect, an exercise that will begin next spring.

Chief executive Mark Anderson spoke publicly yesterday for the first time, making it clear that a major restructuring exercise was under way.

He did not deny that job losses would be required, but said it was too early to be specific, saying: “It could be that there will be a number of roles that are impacted, but we haven’t yet got to numbers.

“Can I guarantee everyone a job for life? The answer is no I can’t.” …”

https://www.devonlive.com/news/devon-news/doubts-cast-over-flybe-staying-3435866#comments-section

“Seaside residents earn £1,600 less than people inland”

“Workers living in seaside areas are likely to earn on average £1,600 less per year than those living inland, BBC News analysis has found.

The research also found two-thirds of coastal areas had seen a real terms fall in wages since 2010.

The All Parliamentary Group for Coastal Communities said the findings showed seaside towns were “being left behind”.
But the government said its £200m Coastal Communities Fund was changing lives.

This week BBC News is profiling what life is like in seaside communities across the country as part of the Coastal Britain project.

The most deprived places in England are found by the sea, according to government figures…..

The issue of low pay affects coastal communities across the whole country.

BBC News has analysed income data collected by the Office for National Statistics for 632 parliamentary constituencies in Great Britain. Taking into account full and part time workers the analysis found:

In coastal constituencies, the typical (median) worker in 2018 earned £22,104 before tax

That was £1,681 less than the typical worker in a non-coastal area, who earned £23,785 before tax

When inflation was taken into account annual wages fell in two-thirds of constituencies between 2010 and 2018, a “real terms” decrease

The coastal constituencies of Wirral West and Weston-Super-Mare have seen real terms wages fall by around 25% since 2010

Mike Hill MP, chair of the all Parliamentary Group for Coastal Communities, said “for a long time coastal communities have felt forgotten”.

“Many of these areas have lost industries like shipbuilding that once provided thousands of well paid jobs,” he said.

“There’s research that shows that without major changes, by 2030 places like my own constituency of Hartlepool could see lots of young people leave coastal areas, which underlines why we need the right investment to protect the long term future of our coastal towns.”

At its party conference in September, Labour promised to build 37 offshore wind farms, which it claimed would generate more than 60,000 new well paid jobs in coastal areas. …”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-49890749

“House prices in Devon have risen by around £44,000 in last 12 months, stats show”

The cost of homes in Devon has risen by 3.2 per cent over the past 12 months, with the average homeowner in the county seeing their property value jump by around £44,000 in the last five years. …

IN EAST DEVON:

Those wanting to buy in East Devon saw a slight drop in prices in May this year of 0.6 per cent, despite witnessing a 1.4 per cent rise over the last 12 months.

The latest ONS data shows the average property in the area sold for £282,602. Buyers who made their first step onto the property ladder in East Devon in May also spent an average of £217,225 – around £37,000 more than it would have cost them five years ago.

A total of 3,031 homes were sold in East Devon, five per cent fewer than in the previous year – according to the data for between April last year and March this year.

The average homeowner in East Devon will have seen their property jump in value by around £50,000 in the last five years.”

https://www.midweekherald.co.uk/news/house-prices-in-devon-statistics-1-6180451

“Amazon CONFIRMS it is moving Exeter operations to 100,000 sqft facility close to Cranbrook”

https://www.midweekherald.co.uk/news/cranbrook-move-for-online-retailer-amazon-1-6181313

but not all good news:
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2018/may/31/amazon-accused-of-treating-uk-warehouse-staff-like-robots?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

“England’s seaside towns where young people might disappear”

Does our Local Enterprise Partnership – which could but does not invest in coastal regeneration – care? Not one jot.

“Analysis by BBC News of population projections has found seaside towns in northern England could see the biggest decline in under-30s.

The Parliamentary Group for Coastal Communities said funding cuts meant seaside towns were “being left behind”.

The government said it had invested more than £200m in coastal communities.
The coastline in England is home to some of the most beautiful but also poorest places in England. …

BBC News has analysed the population projections made by the ONS for 75 local authorities in England with a coastline.

More than half of the local authorities could see a fall in the number of residents under the age of 30 by the year 2039.

The biggest decline in the number of under-30s could be in the north of England, where every local authority with a coastline, except Liverpool, might see a fall in the number of young people.

Collectively northern seaside communities might see a reduction of 200,000 under-30s over the next two decades.

In contrast, coastal authorities in the south, such as Bristol (+13%), Canterbury (+6.4%) and Southampton (+4.7%) could see substantial rises in the number of young people …”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-48995925