Top police chiefs cream off cash

“Police chiefs are enjoying a pay and pensions bonanza as council tax is hiked to give their forces an extra £1billion, a Daily Mail investigation reveals today.

Almost two thirds of chief constables from the 39 English police forces earned more than the Prime Minister’s annual pay of £150,402 last year.

They also received an additional total of at least £1.37million in pension contributions in the last two years – with some getting more than £40,000 a year.

This is despite only half receiving a contribution last year, with many of the others’ pension pots thought to have reached the maximum threshold. ”

Tens of thousands of pounds more of public money was also spent on private healthcare, housing and car allowances for senior officers – with one police chief’s package worth nearly £300,000. …..

Police pension schemes include a taxpayer-funded employer contribution of 21.3 per cent of their pay, on top of an officer’s contribution. Ian Hopkins, chief constable of Greater Manchester Police, who has received £92,000 pension contributions over the past two years – as well as a £200,000 salary – claimed the squeeze would force him to cut his officer numbers to the lowest level since 1975. …..

A Home Office spokesman said: ‘It is for the independent Police Remuneration Review Body to consider the appropriate levels of police pay and make recommendations to ministers.’”

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6498233/Police-chiefs-enjoy-pay-pensions-bonanza-council-tax-bills-rise.html

“More visible police resources for Cranbrook”… but … not yet!

“Cranbrook has been promised a police office in its future town hall development, and ‘more visible resources’ to tackle speeding and anti-social behaviour.

No decision has been made yet on a neighbourhood beat manager, but residents are being urged to report all incidents to help make the case for a stronger police presence.

Devon and Cornwall’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Alison Hernandez, attended Cranbrook Town Council’s meeting on Monday, November 19, with two senior police officers and two from the local area policing team, to hear residents’ concerns.

During the meeting, Ms Hernandez said she was ‘committed’ to having a police office in The Tillhouse when it is built – a statement that was welcomed by the town council.

She said the employment of a neighbourhood beat manager would not be achieved in the short term, but Cranbrook needs to keep providing evidence of the need for one.

“Encourage your community to report everything – if you don’t, it will be harder to fight for that resource,” she said.

“Reporting is really important. It is logged and it has a resourcing implication.”

The police officers present said even if they cannot attend a reported incident immediately, they need information about offenders from the local community so that they can take action at a later stage. …”

“East Devon PCSO numbers to be slashed to five ‘by 2020’ “

“East Devon’s PCSO numbers are set to fall again by 2020 – bringing to the total number of officers to just five across the region.

Honiton PCSO Rich Shelton revealed the cuts at the meeting of Honiton Town Council last Monday.

He said: “PCSO numbers are going down to 200 by March 2020.

“That was from a figure of 360 a couple of years ago, across Devon and Cornwall.

“In East Devon now, we currently have nine.

“They are stationed at Honiton, Sidmouth, Seaton and Axminster.

“That figure we believe will go down to five.”

A spokesman for Devon and Cornwall Police said: “The total number of PCSOs across Devon and Cornwall will be 200 by 2020, instead of the original figure which was 150 by 2021.

“That originally was changed in response from the feedback we received from our partners and the general public.”

http://www.midweekherald.co.uk/news/east-devon-pcso-numbers-to-be-slashed-to-five-by-2020-1-5784000

Local police ask for “Citizens in Policing” volunteers

“Devon and Cornwall Police have called for people to volunteer to help the force in a scheme called Citizens in Policing.

While the police have long had the special constabulary, which sees people working as volunteer officers alongside “regular” officers, there are also a number of other volunteer roles available.

Sarah Corber, citizens in policing development officer, said in 2016 the police force looked at “the in funding and the reduction of police officers in Devon and Cornwall” and “realised that we are not maximising the community around us”.

Sarah, who is based in Camborne and covers the west half of Cornwall from Truro to Penzance, has been working to increase the number of volunteers and making people more aware of how they can volunteer for the police.

She explained that the special constabulary was “crucial to the force” and said there was work being done to attract a wider range of people to get involved.

“What we are finding at the moment with the special constabulary is we have a lot of young people getting involved but they then move on very quickly to become regular police officers,” she said.

“We are struggling to maintain our numbers.”

She said the police wanted to hear from more people who wanted to become specials as volunteers, not as a way of starting a career in policing, and from “older people and people from more diverse backgrounds”.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-devon-46102131

Hernandez says police have no social responsibilities – NHS and councils should take them off police forces

Owl says: this would mean the NHS and local authorities would need to create a full 24-hour, 7 day a week totally responsive crisis service!

“Police officers are not social workers or mental health workers, yet spend far too much of their time dealing with issues that would be better handled by the NHS or local authorities. I don’t think policing should be the main point of contact for people having mental health crises, and our officers shouldn’t be the lead negotiators for suicidal people. It was refreshing to hear similar sentiments aired by a senior and well-regarded police officer.”

Alison Hernandez
Devon and Cornwall Police Commissioner

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-devon-45972475

Devon and Cornwall police force “on cliff edge”

“The Devon and Cornwall Police Federation has written to all MPs in the two counties saying the force is on “a cliff edge”.

Chair Andrew Berry said the problem was twofold.

He said: “The policing budget for our force has reduced by £15m in cash terms since 2010/11 and, during that time, we have lost 975 personnel, including 510 police officers – that is 15% less police officers.” ..”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/live/uk-england-devon-45972471