EDDC CEO Mark Williams at loggerheads with Cranbrook Town Council

Unfortunately, the photographs of the correspondence do not copy well, so go to the Cranbrook Town Council website to read (Owl has taken poor but hopefully legible on this site copies should they disappear)

https://www.facebook.com/cranbrooktowncouncil/
Post dated 18 September 2019 at 14.26

A taster …

Council letter

Williams letter:

Battle lines drawn!

BREAKING NEWS: “GP provider abandons Cranbrook Medical Centre”

And this in a town which has got grants to become a “Healthy New Town”!

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“Hundreds of residents could be without GPs if a new provider is not found for Cranbrook Medical Centre by March next year.

Access Health Care (AHC) has revealed it will not be extending its contract which is due to expire in March 2020.

The firm, which operates from the Younghayes Centre, has cited staff recruitment and retention and Cranbrook’s location as reasons to pull the plug on operations.

The medical centre has experienced low patient numbers, adding to AHC’s burgeoning financial pressures.

NHS Devon Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), which is responsible for planning, paying for and monitoring GP practices in Devon, said its priority is to make sure that the population of Cranbrook continues to have access to a full range of GP services and care.

Mark Procter, director of primary care at the CCG, said: “We have a number of options to explore and are committed to finding the right solution for Cranbrook.

“All services continue at Cranbrook Medical Centre and patients should attend appointments as normal.

“We are writing to patients with further information this week and will keep them up to date with developments.”

Three drop-in sessions have been arranged at the centre so the CCG can hear people’s views on the process.

The first two will be held on Tuesday, October 15, from 10am to noon, and 2pm to 4pm.

The third will be staged on Wednesday, October 16, from 6pm to 8pm.

Mr Proctor said: “In the meantime, please be reassured that there is no need for you to take any action and all appointments and services continue as normal at Cranbrook Medical Centre.”

https://www.midweekherald.co.uk/news/gp-provider-abandons-cranbrook-medical-centre-1-6278291

Trump, Obama, Netflix – and Taylor Wimpey in Cranbrook?

Owl is not just interested in East Devon, oh no. Owl has relatives in the United States and has been known to cast its beady eyes over the pond to see what the owls over there are up to.

Imagine Owl’s surprise when reading about President Trump’s latest spat with ex-President Obama about Obama’s contract with Netflix to see this Google “push” advert pop up:

Now, Owl knows this is a targeted, personalised ad – but who would have expected it to turn up here? And why does Taylor Wimpey think Owl wants one of their little boxes in Cranbrook?

Obviously desperate times for Taylor Wimpey and Cranbrook!

“Historic High Street funding winners named”

The south-west, as usual, gets least funding, and, of course, Cranbrook, with no town centre at all, is NOT historic!

“Historic English shopping centres will benefit from a £95m regeneration fund, the government has said.

In all, 69 towns and cities will receive money, with projects aimed at turning disused buildings into shops, houses and community centres.

The largest share of money, £21.1m, will go to the Midlands, with £2m going to restore buildings in Coventry that survived World War Two bombing.

The government said the move would “breathe new life” into High Streets.

The government’s Future High Street Fund is providing £52m of the money, while £40m will come from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). A further £3m is being provided by the National Lottery Heritage Fund.

Towns and cities had to bid for the £95m funding, which was first announced in May.

The announcement comes after figures showed that about 16 shops a day closed in the first half of the year as retailers restructure their businesses and more shopping moves online.

Lisa Hooker, consumer markets leader at PwC which was behind the research, said retailers had to invest more in making stores “relevant to today’s consumers”, but added that “new and different types of operators” needed encouragement to fill vacant space.

‘Wider regeneration’

The government said the money would “support wider regeneration” in the 69 successful areas by attracting future commercial investment.

“Our nation’s heritage is one of our great calling cards to the world, attracting millions of visitors to beautiful historic buildings that sit at the heart of our communities,” said Culture Secretary Nicky Morgan.

“It is right that we ensure these buildings are preserved for future generations but it is important that we make them work for the modern world.”

Other major projects include a £2m drive to restore historic shop-fronts in London’s Tottenham area, which suffered extensive damage in the 2011 riots.

By region, the funding breaks down as follows:

London and the South East: £14.3m
South West: £13.7m
Midlands: £21.1m
North East and Yorkshire: £17.2m
North West: £18.7m

You can read a full list of the towns and cities that will benefit here

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49692091

but for south-west:

Chard
Cullompton
Gloucester
Keynsham
Midsomer Norton
Plymouth
Poole
Redruth
Tewkesbury
Weston-Super-Mare

“Increasing competition from online outlets is putting High Streets across the country under growing pressure,” said the DCMS.

“As part of the government’s drive to help High Streets adapt to changing consumer habits, the £95m funding will provide a welcome boost.”

Responding to the move, shadow culture secretary Tom Watson said High Streets had been “decimated” by “a decade of Tory austerity”.

He added: “This funding pales in comparison to the £1bn Cultural Capital fund that Labour is committed to, which will boost investment in culture, arts and heritage right across the country, not just a few lucky areas.”

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49692090

DevonLive’s attempt to talk up Cranbrook – own goal

UPDATE: in the couple of hours since the publication of this post, the comments on the DevonLive site have been cleaned up!

Hot on the heels of criticism of Cranbrook, DevonLive attempted to find some “good news” about it. However, it didn’t go quite to plan.

The first person they chose works in the local estate agent’s office – well, you’d hardley expect any criticism there – duh.

The second person had a few nice things to say about it and then rather spoilt it with this comment:

… It feels like they [houses] were just thrown up, to be honest, with cheap materials.” she says. “The walls are very thin. It is fine between our house and the neighbours but the inside walls are different. There is a lot of creaking and you don’t expect that with a new house. The garage roof was leaking too. That was fixed but it is leaking again now.

It would be nice to have a town centre,” she says. “They keep saying we’ll have one but we haven’t yet. This Co-op can’t really cope with the number of people. We like it here overall. The school facilities are very good and there are a lot of young families. We don’t have any plans to move and will stay for the foreseeable future.

“On the downside the trains are crowded and often don’t turn up at all. But they’ve just put more buses on and they are every 20 minutes to Exeter.”

The third person said:

“… The shop should be more affordable. Overall it is enjoyable but there is not enough to do for the teenagers. I have a teenage son and I don’t think there is anything here for him to do. Some of them hang around the shop and benches in the evening.

“The primary school is lovely but we have problems with communication with the college.”

Then comes journalism at its BEST! What makes Cranbrook so good?

The constant supply of new housing is clearly a selling point for Cranbrook. Young families in particular are attracted to homes built for modern-living, with fitted kitchens, double-glazing, reliable boilers and infrastructure, patio-doors to the garden, little or no upkeep worries.”

Er, sorry guys, Cranbrook Town Council just took on estate rent charges from developers for the whole town and council tax bills rose to cover them!

The journalist goes on, foot in mouth:

As of 2019 Cranbrook – a start-from-scratch development – is a market town without a market and a population to shop ratio of 1:5,000.”

THEN you come to the comments! Suffice to say, most are NOT complimentary, and some are VERY rude!

Better luck next time!

https://www.devonlive.com/news/devon-news/what-people-really-think-cranbrook-3285460#comments-section