How to submit a question to Sidmouth hustings

From Vision Group for Sidmouth:

This is your ‘red button’ to leave a question:
https://visionforsidmouth.org/contact/
Otherwise questions can be submitted on the night at the door by 7.30pm.
Note: At the last general election hustings held by the Vision Group in Sidmouth, quite a few people turned up late to attend because there had been an important council meeting that same evening. In other words, it’ll be no problem to arrive after 7.30pm and after the Late Night Shopping, as candidates will be giving short presentations in the first half and taking questions in the second.
A seat cannot be guaranteed though!

Sidmouth hustings 6 December slight delay to start time (now 7.30 pm)

“The General Election Hustings planned for Sidmouth on December 6 has been put back half an hour due to the town’s Late Night Shopping event.

The event will now run from 7.30pm to 9pm.

Peter Murphy, chair of the event, said, “We wanted to complement the shopping event in Sidmouth and not compete with it. And so we decided to move the start time from 7pm to 7.30pm, to allow people to take part in both events.”

The Vision Group for Sidmouth, which is hosting the hustings, says that the calling of the snap general election left little time for organization and there were limited dates for the use of halls to hold the event.

Friday, December 6, had already been chosen by the Chamber of Commerce for its annual Late Night Shopping – so in order to avoid a clash, the Vision Group has pushed its own event to start a little later.

As Peter commented: “This way, we hope that people will be attracted to the centre of town with a double bill that evening!”

The hustings will be attended by all six parliamentary candidates and will be held at All Saints’ Hall, All Saints’ Road, near the hospital in Sidmouth.

All are welcome to come along.

To put a question to the candidates, click the red button below and write to the group’s secretary.

Sidford: “Air pollution nanoparticles linked to brain cancer for first time”

“New research has linked air pollution nanoparticles to brain cancer for the first time.

The ultra-fine particles (UFPs) are produced by fuel burning, particularly in diesel vehicles, and higher exposures significantly increase people’s chances of getting the deadly cancer. Previous work has shown that nanoparticles can get into the brain and that they can carry carcinogenic chemicals. …”

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/nov/13/air-pollution-particles-linked-to-brain-cancer-in-new-research?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

“Have your say on the management of East Devon’s Jurassic Coast”

A Jurrasic Coast National Park from Studland Bay to Exmouth? Surely our new ruling group will be keen on that won’t they?

“The organisation that looks after the Jurassic Coast is inviting input from people in East Devon, as it sets out its management plan for the next five years.

A draft plan has been drawn up, and consultation days will be held in Exmouth, Sidmouth and Seaton for people to learn about the proposals and have their say.

The Jurassic Coast Trust’s work includes putting out information about rock falls and landslips, promoting responsible fossil collecting, educating the public through museums and visitor centres, and giving guidance to local organisations, to ensure that development and tourism does not harm the Jurassic Coast.

Public consultation days will take place on

Tuesday, September 10,
at Exmouth Library;

Thursday, September 19,
at Sidmouth Library; and

Wednesday, September 25,
at Seaton Jurassic.

Members of the trust’s staff will be on hand between 10am and 3pm to talk through the draft plan and answer questions.

Following the consultation, the plan is due to be published in the next few months.”

Clean air: too late for Sidford

“Thousands of lives a year would be saved by reducing air pollution to safe levels under draft legislation to be presented to parliament.

The Air Pollution Bill would require the government to adopt tighter limits based on World Health Organisation recommendations, a key objective of the Times Clean Air for All Campaign.

Ministers would, for the first time, have a clear duty to act on a problem that cuts short the lives of 36,000 people a year, costs the economy £20 billion annually in healthcare and impact on businesses and, if left unchecked, would cause 2.4 million new cases of disease in the next 16 years.

The bill, which has been drawn up by a coalition of environmental groups and air pollution scientists, will be discussed tomorrow at the parliamentary launch of the Clean Air for All campaign. It would also require air pollution monitors to be installed in every postcode and outside every school and hospital.

It will be tabled as a private member’s bill in either the Commons or the Lords and is expected to gain support from MPs and peers of all the main parties. Its supporters hope the government will adopt the measures in the forthcoming Environment Bill.

The government has pledged that the Environment Bill will contain measures to reduce air pollution but has yet to confirm what they will be. Michael Gove said in one of his last speeches as environment secretary that he wanted “a legally binding commitment on particulate matter so that no part of the country exceeds the levels recommended by the WHO”. Theresa Villiers, his successor, has yet to set out her plans.

The Times launched its Clean Air for All Campaign in May with a manifesto calling for a new Clean Air Act to confer a legal right to unpolluted air for everyone in the UK. The campaign also calls for sales of new petrol and diesel cars to be banned by 2030.

The Air Pollution Bill has been drawn up by Environmental Defence Fund (EDF), a charity that has been working on it with the UK100 group, representing mayors of big cities, and other green groups, including Client Earth and Green Alliance.

Baroness Worthington, EDF’s director and a crossbench peer, said: “The current approach to lowering pollution isn’t working.”

The bill would also require the government to publish an annual report on progress and establish an independent body to advise the government on how to meet air pollution targets.

A spokesman for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said: “We know the impact air pollution has on communities around the UK, which is why we are taking urgent action to improve air quality.”

Source: The Times

DevonLive really has it in for the county it gets its tourism advertising from …

Hot on the heels of a sensationalist article about Axminster being called “Crackminster” on the flimsiest of evidence comes another article on horrible things people say (or rather one person about each town) says about 9 Devon towns – including Sidmouth and (again) Axminster:

https://www.devonlive.com/whats-on/whats-on-news/nine-devon-towns-been-ripped-3263833?fbclid=IwAR0mzaKai8YQCjAM7SkPfWexYM2YL_Un5hzWLj5bY2JoaIlN6Y8k6uk05rQ

Seems like DevonLive is re-inventing itself as the Daily Fail of the south-west!

“Growing up in air-polluted areas linked to mental health issues”

Welcome Sidford Business Park:

“People who spend their childhood in areas with high levels of air pollution may be more likely to later develop mental disorders, research suggests.

Air pollution has become a matter of growing concern as an increasing number of studies have found links to conditions ranging from asthma to dementia and various types of cancer.

There are also signs it may take a toll on mental health. Research published in January found that children growing up in the more polluted areas of London were more likely to have depression by the age of 18 than those growing up in areas with cleaner air.

But a study by researchers in the US and Denmark has suggested a link between air pollution and an increased risk of mental health problems, including bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and personality disorders. …”

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2019/aug/20/growing-up-in-air-polluted-areas-linked-to-mental-health-issues?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other